Not for me, thanks. Source: University of Chicago news

Why I didn’t vote for anybody in the recent Australian federal elections

Alex Anyfantis

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And it has nothing to do with “no party represented my ideals”…

Last Saturday, Australians from around the globe were called up to fulfil their political duty and cast their vote on who they wanted as their next government. Many of them had enrolled from early on, with over 50 percent having already voted before midday, in what was called “the most crucial election of the century”.

Following the rules that we all abide by as a community, I also enrolled, waited patiently in line and when the time came, submitted my vote. Who did I vote for? Absolutely nobody, as I have always done as either a citizen of Greece or Australia. I made sure my vote was considered invalid.

You see, I come from Greece and over there exists one of the most corrupt political environments a person can ever find, second only perhaps to that of India or North Korea. In Greece, politicians lie blatantly in people’s faces, making empty promises and delivering nothing when inevitably one party wins the elections.

Each government does whatever it can to leave the nation in a worse state than what they found it in, with politicians milking the public funds dry for their own personal use, burning down public forests to build their own private property and reducing public and private payments to amounts way below the poverty zone.

Almost every day a new scandal involving one member of parliament or another breaks out on the news, only for it to disappear a few days later, with no one paying any fines, no public investigations held, no people found guilty and life going on as usual.

The highlight of this situation of course was when Greece, a nation that owes money to anyone who speaks English and their great-grandparents, decided they were no longer going to pay off their loans to the EU, simply because they didn’t want to! The result was that banks were left bone dry and people couldn’t withdraw a cent, even though they were actually getting paid for their services. Essentially, the nation was operating on slavery, as people didn’t want to simply abandon their jobs, yet they weren’t receiving any compensation.

The situation in Oz

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Alex Anyfantis

Media graduate, professional journalist and self-proclaimed Final Fantasy fanboy. Interests (and die-hard passions) include gaming and sports (mainly football).