Hey Joshua. Thanks for your comment. Allow me to reply.

In my opinion, there are two arguments to be made here.

First off, a game is not defined by its characters. A game is made up of many other elements, such as the story, the gameplay, the music, etc. When all these come together in a way that compliments one another and works, then you have a really good game.

Secondly, if we were to go by this train of thought, then all great JRPGs made in the 90's are guilty of misrepresentation of white people in their games. Cloud Strife from FF VII - a record-breaking title - is shown to be a white male. Barret Wallace is a black male. Yet the development team was comprised of Asian people. That didn't hold the game back in the slightest. Not that, and not the hundreds of others of games in this great genre.

Stifling creativity in such a way that we need to place limits where someone who's clearly talented isn't permitted to write or publish a story that could even be good, will only come back to hurt us as we are held back from some truly great tales. As pointed out in the article, these stories and characters should be told in a respectful manner, but at the same time, we also need to respect the artist's creativity.

Media graduate, professional journalist and self-proclaimed Final Fantasy fanboy. Interests (and die-hard passions) include gaming and sports (mainly football).

Media graduate, professional journalist and self-proclaimed Final Fantasy fanboy. Interests (and die-hard passions) include gaming and sports (mainly football).